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2016 Spring Term Festival

Students displayed their Spring Term projects during the 2016 Festival held on May 20 on the main floor of Leyburn Library. This poster below, created by students from CSCI 335, showcases the development of high-performance software for web applications.

stf2
Perry O’Connor ’17 explains her team’s work on the Symbolic Logic Tutorial to Professor Gavin Fox. Asha Campbell ’17 (seated) also worked on the Symbolic Logic Tutorial. Mina Shnoudah ’17 (right) demonstrated his team’s Ancient Graffiti Project application next.

csci335_spring16_poster



Student-Designed Web App Helps W&L Students Plan Course Schedules

Corsola Team
Corsola Team

Thanks to (from left to right) Richard Marmorstein ’14,  Alex Baca ’14, Alicia Bargar ’13 and Phil Lisovicz ’13, Washington and Lee University students have a new web application designed to make their schedule planning easier. Corsola: Scheduling Your Life allows students to choose their preferred courses and view potential schedule conflicts. Click here to read more… http://news.blogs.wlu.edu/2013/09/12/new-corsola-web-application-helps-wl-students-plan-course-schedules/



W&L Faculty to Present Collaborative Project at LAWDI Institute

Rebecca Benefiel, associate professor of classics at Washington and Lee University, and Sara Sprenkle, assistant professor of computer science at W&L, will present their prototype of a new web application involving the ancient graffiti of Pompeii at the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) later this month

W&L Faculty to Present Collaborative Project at LAWDI Institute

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W&L Robots Rock the Spring Term Fair

Twenty-three students from CSCI 250 presented six different projects at the annual W&L Spring Term Fair in Leyburn Library — so many projects that they were given their own floor of the library for the demos!  W&L innovations included using Python to fly an AR.Drone via Kinect hand gestures and to navigate a Neato XV-11 LIDAR robot around an obstacle, as well as the cool projects depicted below (Steve Goryl photo credits).

ImageDeirdre  and Haley used a Raspberry Pi to add sonar capability to their Brookstone Rover ‘bot.

ImageSam, Drew, Jok, and Darren built and programmed a robotic arm.

ImageMichael, Stephen, and Hank built an R/C plane with remote pan-tilt camera and laptop controller.

ImageLee, James, and Colin programmed an AR.Drone to follow a moving ground vehicle.



CSCI335 Students Demo Their Web Applications at Spring Term Fair

Thirteen students in CSCI335: Software Engineering through Web Applications demonstrated their three team projects at the Spring Fest.  In teams of four or five, the students gathered requirements for their project, created a static prototype, and developed a dynamic, user-friendly prototype–all in four weeks.

CSCI335 Students
CSCI335 students present their applications on their laptops to students and faculty.

Each student worked on one of three projects:

  • The Collegium Project – a digital humanities project in collaboration with Professor Sarah Bond, a history professor at Marquette University and a former Mellon Fellow at W&L.
  • Corsola – a tool for visualizing course schedules and conflicts.  W&L students may be able to use a version of Corsola as early as this fall.
  • The Ancient Graffiti Search Engine Project – a digital humanities project in collaboration with classics professor Rebecca Benefiel
Paul Jang '15 demonstrates the Ancient Graffiti project to Professor Janelle Gertz
Paul Jang ’15 demonstrates the Ancient Graffiti project to Professor Janelle Gertz
Olivier Mahame '14 (l) and Cathy Wang '15 (r) demonstrate the Collegium project to Chief Technology Officer David Saake.
Olivier Mahame ’14 (l) and Cathy Wang ’15 (r) demonstrate the Collegium project to Chief Technology Officer David Saake on the big screen.


Computer Science spring-term course is #5 in the “Top 10 Wildest”

The Ring Tum Phi has picked CSCI 251: iPhone Application Programming as #5 in its list of Top Ten Wildest Spring-Term Courses.  We landed halfway between Music 101: Physics & Perception of Music (#10) and Chemistry 155: Science of Cooking: Italy (#1, an obvious choice).



Spring-Term CSCI ‘bots invade Leyburn Library

This year’s W&L Spring-Term Festival took place in Leyburn Library, and the Computer Science Department was there in force: the twelve students enrolled in CSCI 250: Introduction to Robotics demonstrated robots that flew over obstacles, followed their creators around like a pet, played a game of Tron, and obeyed commands issued from an XBox Kinect sensor.  There was even some cross-project interference, as the Kinect-driven bot tried to steal the Rovipet’s beloved green ball.

CSCI 250 also featured a field trip to the Areva Nuclear Power facility in Lynchburg, where we got to see some bigger robots in action.

               



An Algorithm for Fun!

In Wednesday’s CSCI111: Fundamental of Programming I class, the students wrote an algorithm for making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.   Fellow student Jean Paul Mugabe ’14 then attempted to make a PB&J sandwich using their algorithm.  The students could not make any assumptions about what Jean Paul knew, and Jean Paul did exactly what they told him to do in the algorithm.

Jean Paul Mugabe '14 follows the class's PB&J algorithm, while Professor Sara Sprenkle asks questions. As you can see, the class did not tell Jean Paul to remove the peanut butter jar's safety seal, so he stuck the knife through the safety seal.

This exercise illustrates the importance of having unambiguous programming languages because computers cannot infer what we’re telling it to do.  The exercise also motivates some important properties of algorithms, such as what data and operations we have available, naming, ordering steps, handling special cases, looping, and subroutines.




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